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Rogaining Tips: Night Navigation

NIGHT TIME CAN BE THE BEST PART OF A ROGAINE
To me, rogaining at night is the most enjoyable part of any event. Watching a huge golden full moon rise, navigating under its light all night, then watching it slowly set again is awesome. Everyone should experience this at least once. Here are some tips to help you during the night.

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Rogaining Tips: THE clues can be A help

Are the setters just being sloppy when one clue says "The gully" and another says "A gully"? Maybe they skipped the lesson on definite and indefinite articles in English class. No, in fact, they're giving you some help in finding that control.

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Rogaining Tips: Route Planning

"The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand" - Sun Tzu's The Art of War

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Kiilopaa – Saturday 21st August – World Rogaine Championship to Sunday 22nd August

Woke up in the Arctic Circle, at Kiilopaa, Finland, to fine sunny day with an expected maximum temperature of about 20 degrees. Slightly warmer than what we were hoping for.  Transferred our entire route planning gear to our tent in the restricted “Planning Area” and collected our “non waterproof paper” maps at just after 9am.  Spent about an hour planning our course and marking up our maps based on a very conservative 60km straight-line distance.

During our visit to Scotland in the lead up to this event, we did a number of walks over the Scottish moors encountering lots of slow boggy ground.  Expecting the Finland terrain to be similar we didn’t want to overset our course and were initially only going to work on about 50km.  However after trialling a bit of the Rogaine practice map we upped our route distance to 60km as the ground was considerably firmer and in general very pleasant to traverse, a lot of it with a small amount of sponginess underfoot, unlike the bone jarring hardness we normally have.


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